Qualified rehabilitated buildings and certified historic structures currently enjoy a 20 percent investment tax credit for qualified rehabilitation expenses. A historic structure is one listed in the National Register of Historic Places or so designated by an appropriate state or local historic district also certified by the government.

The tax code does not allow deductions for the demolition or significant alternation of a historic structure.

What are some resources for info on home improvements?

If you’re getting ready to embark on a home improvement project involving contracting help, “Ready, Set, Build: A Consumer’s Guide to Home Improvement Planning Contracts” lays out a road map for selecting the right contractor, obtaining competitive bids up to what to include in a contract. There also is information on consumer rights, liens and financing.

The book is available for $9.95 through Consumer Press and Women’s Publications, Inc., Dept. SR01, 13326 Southwest 28th St., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33330-1102; (954) 370-9153.

Resources:

* Profiting From Real Estate Rehab, Sandra M. Brassfield, John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York; 1992.

* Remodeling magazine’s annual “Cost vs. Value Report”, available for a nominal fee from the magazine; call (202) 736-3447 to order a copy.

How do building codes work?

Building codes are established by local authorities to set out minimum public-safety standards for building design, construction, quality, use and occupancy, location and maintenance. There are specialized codes for plumbing, electrical and fire, which usually involve separate inspections and inspectors.

All buildings must be issued a building permit and a certificate of occupancy before it can be used. During construction, housing inspectors must make checks at key points. Codes are usually enforced by denying permits, occupancy certificates and by imposing fines.

Building codes also cover most remodeling projects. If you are buying a house that has been significantly remodeled, ask for proof of the permits involved before you purchase to avoid future liability for fines.

Resources:

* “The Ultimate Language of Real Estate,” John Reilly, Online Title Loans No Store Visit Dearborn Financial Publishing, Chicago; 1993.

Are there gov’t programs for rehab?

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Section 203 (K) rehabilitation loan program is designed to facilitate major structural rehabilitation of houses with one to four units that are more than one year old. Condominiums are not eligible.

The 203(K) loan is usually done as a combination loan to purchase a fixer-upper property “as is” and rehabilitate it, or to refinance a temporary loan to buy the property and do the rehabilitation. It can also be done as a rehabilitation-only loan.

Plans and specifications for the proposed work must be submitted for architectural review and cost estimation. Mortgage proceeds are advanced periodically during the rehabilitation period to finance the construction costs.

For a list of participating lenders, call HUD at (202) 708-2720.

If you are a veteran, loans from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs also can be used to buy a home, build a home, improve a home or to refinance an existing loan. VA loans frequently offer lower interest rates than ordinarily available with other kinds of loans. To qualify for a loan, the first step is to apply for a Certificate of Eligibility.

Another program is the Fedeal Housing Administration’s Title 1 FHA loan program.

 

 

 

 

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