Well the last week of my life has been really busy. Between work, poker and girls I havent had the time to even think about a new blog.

Poker wise nothing interesting to report really. I played a couple of MTT and a NWP private tourney, I woke up real early on Sunday I was really hung-over and for some reason couldnt sleep albeit I was very tired. I decided to play in a MTT the only slot 428 MTT that was to be running soon was a 10$ NL. I figured why not. I played well but never really got any hands, after looking at the stats I requested from poker stars I laughed at my flop seen %. I think most players who play with me know that I am a pretty loose player PF. I like to open pots when the action gets to me. I believe that NL holdem is the truest test of poker when played properly. I think that its always better to be putting people into tough decisions for their chips then to ever really be forced to make one yourself.

10$ NL Tourney stats.

308 hands played and saw flop:

– 9 times out of 40 while in small blind (22%)

– 9 times out of 39 while in big blind (23%)

– 26 times out of 229 in other positions (11%)

– a total of 44 times out of 308 (14%)

Pots won at showdown – 16 out of 21 (76%)

Pots won without showdown – 23

Short handed I couldnt find a hand and eventually made a move with J-4 from the small blind at the BB and he had JJ. It payed a measly 100$ or so.

I didnt see many flops but as the stats show I was making the right plays. I wasnt showing down bad hands at showdown, and was winning my fair share without showdown.

It was just about the same in the NWP tourney I played on Friday, I pretty much played what I think was flawless poker, even short handed I was killing it until the following hand crippled and ended my bid to win. I decided to even close all the tables I was playing on UB and Stars at the time because I said that I wanted to play my A game and win this thing. I had played a few NWP tourneys without really playing hard and when I did I would get donkstruck hard for my whole stack.

Anyways the following hand is from when we just entered the money and 3rd was 31.00$ 2nd was 50+$ I think and 1st was 90+$ around.

Bangem was playing pretty solid as was Seedthrower. Seedthrower was too passive though he allowed me to steal his blinds pretty much the whole final table. All tourney I did a good job of avoiding big pots and getting into it for a lot of chips, I pretty much built my stack from a few pickoffs and got about 1K from Liquidsyphon when I sucked out with AJ to his AQ (gotta get lucky sometimes). When this hand came up I was chip leader and pretty much in command at this point. The call from Bangem and Seedthrower was most definitely some type of A or big paint.

 

We’ve long asked who would be the first sbo poker blogger to make the final table of a big event. Friday, fellow blogger Mike “Lucky Blind” Lacey, has a damned good shot. He finished Day 2 of the French Open in third chip position and has ben playing very well. Plus, he’s one helluva nice guy.

Be sure to check out his progress Friday on the The Nuts link on the left.

I’m Slipping

Fresh off my double triumph last night, I decided to go after a couple cheap SNG’s over at PokerStars again tonight. The results weren’t as good…

starsagain.JPG

Yeah… I only won one. I finished in a lowly 2nd in the other. This time it was $11 turned into $36. I’m not sure where I went wrong!!!

Actually, I was a little fortunate to win the first one. I’m heads up and I raise 3xBB with AQo. My opponent goes all-in and I call. He shows AJo. I’m a huge favorite… until he outflops me. And I don’t mean he caught a Jack. The flop came K-Q-T. He flopped the nut straight. At this point I’m praying for a Jack so we can split, but it’s another T on the turn. Now I’m down to one card… and, amazingly, I get runner-runner T’s to win the pot with a full boat. I suppose it was justice since I was way ahead at the start.

In the one I lost, my opponent was dealt Rockets twice in 7 heads-up hands. On the final hand, I flopped a flush draw and he flopped a set of Aces. He caught his boat on the river, I never caught my flush. He had a 2-to-1 chip advantage and I probably didn’t need to make the move at that point, but I thought I’d take my chances. Being patient heads up works a lot better for me.

So what I’ve determined at this point is that I have a relatively good chance of beating the fish who play $5 SNG’s at PokerStars. Can I get some backers?

Actually, I got to France on a plane that could’ve crashed on landing, then went into an airport where people were blowing up suspicious packages. Nonetheless, I wouldn’t have made it France without the winner of this competition.

Back in a few days with one hell of a story about making it to the final four of a tournament (given…a small tournament) with Mean Gene’s favorite European player in the four seat.

Oh, yeah, I was in the three seat.

And if you have any interest in keeping up with the French Open, be sure to check it out at the EPT blog.

 

Team Titan’s Marvin Rettenmaier is featured in the March 2012 edition of CardPlayer Magazine. The popular poker magazine boldly declares “Mad Marvin link vao w88 Conquers Europe” on its cover, and headlines its in-depth interview with him by stating that Mad Marvin is “hell bent on card player glory.”

Teammate Sam Trickett has frequently appeared on the covers of poker magazines but this is Mad Marvin’s most prominent appearance.

In its article, CardPlayer deals with Marvin’s attempts to win the title of CardPlayer 2011 Player of the Year (POY). That was why Marvin spent “all of last year hopping from tournament to tournament, grinding extremely long hours at the live felt.”

“I really made it my goal to win this ranking before the year had even started, which is kind of a weird goal. I mean other people try to win money and stuff, but I just wanted to win this ranking,” Marvin tells the magazine.

At year’s end, however, Marvin was ranked fourth on the CardPlayer POY leaderboard, behind Ben Lamb, Chris Moorman, and Oleksii Kovalchuk.

“I tried my best and I am proud that I managed to keep up with all the stress I went through last year,” Marvin says. “And if I would have binked one more of those deep runs I had I could have won it as well!”

Marvin is very positive about the year ahead, stating, “I’m looking forward to a great year ahead. I really feel that this is going to be my year. I will try to have a better work-life balance, play destinations where I have more than poker, not play tired anymore and therefore play my absolute A-game a lot more often.”

Marvin finishes his interview with CardPlayer by stating, “I would really like to win a major tournament, maybe a bracelet this summer, and I’m very confident in my game. I’ve been in so many spots where I was very close to it, so I feel like it’s only a matter of time.”

Check Lord of the Grind Status in Real Time

Players are grinding away at the tables and tournaments in efforts to earn Points and meet their targets in Lord of the Grind, Titan Poker’s exciting new promotion that launched on the first of the month.

The Lord of the Grind promotion offers players something unique. For the first time they can check their progress towards meeting the monthly targets in real time. The personal information is available either on the Titan Poker website or directly in the software.

Lord of the Grind challenges players with monthly targets, listed at a number of levels. For example, a player is challenged to earn 30 Points on 10 separate days, and if he succeeds, he will receive a $5 cash bonus and a $15 pending bonus. There are multiple levels and rewards offered, and players may succeed in completing more than one over the course of the month. At the end of the month, players are rewarded for the highest target level they’ve achieved.

To participate in the Lord of the Grind poker promotion, players must first opt-in on the Titan Poker website. Then they are encouraged to start playing and earning Points. It’s a simple task for a player to check his progress so far in the promotion, and this can be done by clicking the “Check Your Status” button on the website or clicking on “News & Offers” on the navigational menu in the software.

The Lord of the Grind status page shows a player’s Points earned per calendar day. In addition, the player is tracked on each of the monthly levels, showing how close he is to completing the level and how many days are left until the end of the month. Players can earn Points towards achieving more than one level simultaneously, but only one reward will be awarded to them at the end of the month.

Players are enjoying Lord of the Grind in March, especially due to the fact that they know exactly how close they are to receiving cash prizes and bonuses.

 

Players are grinding away at the tables and tournaments in efforts to earn Points and meet their targets in Lord of the Grind, Titan Poker’s exciting new promotion that launched on the first of the month.

The Lord of the Grind promotion offers players something unique. For the first time they can check their progress towards meeting the monthly targets in real time. The personal information is available either on the Titan Poker website or directly in the software.

Lord of the Grind challenges players with monthly targets, listed at a number of levels. For example, a player is challenged to earn 30 Points on 10 separate days, and if he succeeds, he will receive a $5 cash bonus and a $15 pending bonus. There are multiple levels and rewards offered, and players may succeed in completing more than one over the course of the month. At the end of the month, players are rewarded for the highest target level they’ve achieved.

To participate in the Lord of the Grind poker promotion, players must first opt-in on the Titan Poker website. Then they are encouraged to start playing and earning Points. It’s a simple task for a player to check his progress so far in the promotion, and this can be done by clicking the “Check Your Status” button on the website or clicking on “News & Offers” on the navigational menu in the software.

The Lord of the Grind status page shows a player’s Points earned per calendar day. In addition, the player is tracked on each of the monthly levels, showing how close he is to completing the level and how many days are left until the end of the month. Players can earn Points towards achieving more than one level simultaneously, but only one reward will be awarded to them at the end of the month.

Players are enjoying Lord of the Grind in March, especially due to the fact that they know exactly how close they are to receiving cash prizes and bonuses.

Marvin Rettenmaier Featured in Togel Singapore

Team Titan’s Marvin Rettenmaier is featured in the March 2012 edition of CardPlayer Magazine. The popular poker magazine boldly declares “Mad Marvin Rettenmaier Conquers Europe” on its cover, and headlines its in-depth interview with him by stating that Mad Marvin is “hell bent on card player glory.”

Teammate Sam Trickett has frequently appeared on the covers of poker magazines but this is Mad Marvin’s most prominent appearance.

In its article, CardPlayer deals with Marvin’s attempts to win the title of CardPlayer 2011 Player of the Year (POY). That was why Marvin spent “all of last year hopping from tournament to tournament, grinding extremely long hours at the live felt.”

“I really made it my goal to win this ranking before the year had even started, which is kind of a weird goal. I mean other people try to win money and stuff, but I just wanted to win this ranking,” Marvin tells the magazine.

At year’s end, however, Marvin was ranked fourth on the CardPlayer POY leaderboard, behind Ben Lamb, Chris Moorman, and Oleksii Kovalchuk.

“I tried my best and I am proud that I managed to keep up with all the stress I went through last year,” Marvin says. “And if I would have binked one more of those deep runs I had I could have won it as well!”

Marvin is very positive about the year ahead, stating, “I’m looking forward to a great year ahead. I really feel that this is going to be my year. I will try to have a better work-life balance, play destinations where I have more than poker, not play tired anymore and therefore play my absolute A-game a lot more often.”

Marvin finishes his interview with CardPlayer by stating, “I would really like to win a major tournament, maybe a bracelet this summer, and I’m very confident in my game. I’ve been in so many spots where I was very close to it, so I feel like it’s only a matter of time.”

 

Daniel Negreanu knows how to pick a fight. Matt Savage is probably the most respected tournament director in the world and also happens to be the target of Negrenau’s recent ire. The dispute? A poker tournament rule that’s got Negreanu’s chips in a bunch. The rule: players can’t disclose the contents of their hand. In an attempt to have the rule changed, Negreanu has been publicly challenging (with, you might say, some attitude) Matt Savage on the rule. What’s followed has been an entertaining and informative dispute between the players and the tournament directors who make the rules they play by.

The short of it is that players are not allowed to disclose the contents of their hand.

The long of it, from the rule book:

“Players are obligated to protect the other players in the tournament at all times. Therefore, players, whether in the hand or not, may not:

Disclose contents of live or folded hands,

Advise or criticize play at any time,

Read a hand that hasn’t been tabled.

The one-player-to-a-hand rule will be enforced.”

Though the rule is seven years old, it has only recently been enforced with consistency. For example, in this year’s WSOP Negreanu took issue with the rule when he was seated at a table where the rule was being enforced. The Tournament Directors Association (TDA) rule, according to Negreanu, severely impairs a player’s speaking rights at the table, to the point where they are forced to say nothing. This is because the rule is enforced in dramatically different ways by different tournament directors.

As the Canadian poker star put it, “The problem with this rule is that the TDA cannot agree as a group as to what constitutes breaking this rule. There is far too much wiggle room for a floor person to rule one way or the other…The goal of the TDA has been to standardize rules, but they have made a grave error with this rule because it cannot be standardized the way it’s currently written, because every floor person will rule identical situations differently.”

During the slot online indonesia , Negreanu (@realkidpoker) sent out a slew of entertaining and energetic tweets to Matt Savage (@savagepoker):

@savagepoker you couldn’t possibly be more wrong but are obviously too stubborn to understand the lack of logic behind your weak argument.

@SavagePoker your dumb rule hurts honest people and helps protect those that collude. You don’t get it. Oh well.

@SavagePoker better question: do we REALLY need TD’s over policing table chat that’s been part of the game since it’s inception?

@SavagePoker I’mguessing over 90% of fans and players understand how awful this rule is. You’ll awaken eventually. You’re too smart not to.

In the end, the upset pro at least left with a gesture of nicety:

@SavagePoker Sad you don’t get it, but I still love you!

Then, to up the ante, Savage and Negreanu appeared on a radio show together for a full-on debate! This was just last week.

Savage eagerly defended the rule, stating that players could easily collude if they were allowed to reveal the contents of their hand. Negreanu’s position on the matter is simple:

“If you allow table talk, everyone is all of a sudden going to start colluding with each other. Huh? I never colluded before this rule was implemented, and taking away this rule isn’t going to make everyone feel like they have a license to cheat. Verbal collusion is illegal. Table talk, and revealing information about your hole cards doesn’t equal collusion. In fact, verbal collusion is by far the least likely way two legitimate cheaters would ever cheat because it brings more attention to what they are doing.”

How this will all turn out will likely depend on poker players keeping the pressure on the TDA. If the rule is seriously hurting how players play, the TDA (including Matt Savage!) isn’t going to have much choice but to give in. As Negreanu commented, “Thanks to mediums like twitter, and poker forums, more voices can be heard to support changing this rule and the way it’s currently being implemented.”

So weigh in on Twitter! Send your tweets of support to @realkidpoker or @savagepoker, depending on where you stand, and help the chips fall your way.

 

I have a new tool for the tables, something I put together recently that I hope will help me more than some random good-luck charm or card protector. It’s a white disk, about the size of an air-hockey puck or dealer’s button, with “THINK” slothoki printed on it in big red letters.

It’s a bit silly and I’ve already gotten a few comments, but I’m hoping it’ll buy me those extra seconds that can mean saving or not missing a bet, seconds that remind me that poker is a game of the eyes and the brain, not the hands and heart.

Two quick examples:

In middle position with King-Jack suited, take the flop five-handed. The flop comes KT5 rainbow, checked around to me, I bet. There’s a fold and then the rock on the button raises. It’s folded around to me and I immediately call the bet.

Had I taken five seconds to think about the situation I would have thought: this guy is a rock’s rock, one that makes other rocks change tables, the kind of guy who last tried a bluff during the Carter administration, it didn’t work out, and hasn’t tried since. What did I think he was in the hand with, forget throwing in a raise? K9? K8? About the only worse King I could even imagine him having is KT, giving him two-pair. The only conceivable draw would be QJ, and if that, why raise? If he had AA, AK, or KK he would have raised preflop, so the most likely hand is…KQ, which I proceeded to pay two large bets in order to see after the river.

Now, I suppose even knowing all this I might have still called his raise (even though the odds weren’t really there) to see the turn, but the point is that I was on poker-autopilot and none of this entered my mind until I reverse-engineered it on the showdown. My failure to take five seconds to think cost me at least two big bets.

Here’s a happier example. I raise pre-flop in early position with two red aces, get two dangerous loose-aggressive callers who have been part of about 90% of the hands, plus the big blind. The flop comes down AT9 with two clubs, great but still dangerous — one of these guys could easily have two clubs, QJ…hell, they could have 87. I bet out only to see it raised and then, after a quick look, reraised! What the? The big blind folds and then with my best Olivier pained expression I call, as does the middle player.

There’s a lot of cards I don’t want to see, but the turn is a beautiful, board-pairing ten. Checked to the three-better; bet, call, call. The river is a complete non-flush, non-straight blank (unfortunately), the four of diamonds. I figure that drama class is over and I don’t want to risk losing a bet through a check-raise attempt, so I bet out. The middle guy, obviously drawing, folds, leaving my heads-up opponent to raise me. I immediately reraise him, but before the words have left my mouth he has his own reraise on the felt.

Now, what I should have done right there is stopped for a second. Maybe two. Thought about the situation.

Instead, I panicked, while the alarm in my head started screaming QUADS! QUADS! QUADS! Instead of assessing the situation I threw in my call, said “I can’t beat quads” and turned over my hand (which he, as the aggressor, should have done first, had I given him the opportunity). He did not have the quads (he mucked his hand, but said that he had T9), and I both missed at least one big bet and instantly erased the strong image I had been trying to build.

Now, had I taken five seconds at the right moment, I would have asked the following: if he had pocket tens, would he have three-bet pre-flop to thin the field, as he had been doing all night with big, and even not-so-big hands? Probably. If he hit his set on the flop, would he have three-bet, possibly knocking my, say, AJ out? Probably not. Then, if he miraculously hit quads on the turn, would he have bet, indicating at least trip tens and possibly scaring away the flush/straight draw? Again, probably not. So given all of this, did he have quads…almost certainly not

All of this only came to me midway through the next hand, though, since I let my hands and mouth take over my play, not giving my brain a chance to work. It’s easy to get caught up in a big hand, with a mixture of excitement, anxiety, fear, and adrenaline fogging even the most analytical brain. It’s too easy to forget that most important word at the table: THINK.

When you obtain health insurance coverage, you may not be covered for pre-existing conditions, at least at first. Many health insurance companies have a six- to eighteen-month exclusion period for coverage of pre-existing conditions. This means that although you are paying your monthly health insurance premiums, issues for which you have sought medical attention in the past are not covered during that time frame. Some health insurance companies will not cover an individual with a history of pre-existing conditions, while others will raise the premiums.

A Complex Definition

Pre-existing conditions are defined differently by health insurance providers and employers. Some insurance companies define a pre-existing condition as something for which you have sought medical attention in the past six months. Some states have regulations that determine how long ago the medical issue must have occurred to be defined as a pre-existing condition. Others allow insurance companies to look at a patient’s entire medical history.  Some insurance companies and products define a pre-existing condition as a medical condition that existed before seeking coverage, regardless of whether or not the individual sought medical attention for it.

Examples of Pre-Existing Conditions

Pregnancy: If a woman applies for health insurance after the date her child was conceived, the insurance company may not cover the cost of delivering her baby.

Mental illness: If you have received medical treatment for depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, or other mental illnesses, you may be denied coverage. To learn more about your interest on “cool springs plastic surgery reviews“, check here

Chronic conditions: Medical conditions such as fibromyalgia, arthritis, high blood pressure, asthma, and diabetes are considered chronic conditions. Whether or not they count as pre-existing health conditions depends on the insurer. Some insurance companies only look at whether an individual has been to a doctor within the past six months. If you have asthma but have not used medication or seen a doctor for the condition in the past six months, your asthma may be covered.

Cancer: Whether you have a history of cancer or are currently undergoing treatment, you may be denied coverage or have to pay higher premiums.

Heart disease: Patients with serious heart disease or those who have undergone heart surgery may be considered as having a pre-existing condition.

Your Medical Records

Even if you don’t disclose a particular medical condition when you apply for health insurance coverage, the insurance company may find out about previous illnesses from the Medical Information Bureau. Similar to credit reporting agencies, the Medical Information Bureau provides information about patients’ medical history to insurance companies. Medical information is kept on file for seven years, and individuals can access their Medical Information Bureau report once a year for free. This can help them determine whether now is a good time to apply for health insurance (or health-related insurance, such as life insurance).

Affordable Care Act

The Affordable Care Act, which was passed in 2010, protects individuals with pre-existing conditions. The Act provides Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plans (PCIPs) to patients who have been denied health insurance for a pre-existing condition. By the year 2014, discrimination against patients with pre-existing conditions will be forbidden.

When you apply for health insurance, don’t lie about your medical history. If you do have a pre-existing condition, it is likely that the insurance company will uncover it anyway. Instead, make sure you are aware of what qualifies as a pre-existing condition and what the guidelines are for the specific insurance you are applying for. Since different companies have different specifications, you may be covered if you wait a few months before applying or if you get your condition under control before seeking a new health insurance policy.

 

Over the last few years, I seeked advice and mentorship from various senior and kind leaders in the capital markets and technology industry. We were lucky that many super successful leaders were keen to help us in our Brassica Custodian startup journey. In the last couple of years, we noticed that several younger students who were trying to be entrepeneurs reached out to us looking for feedback and mentorship in their ventures. There issues varied from person to person and business to business, but we noticed many common themes,

Is my idea good enough to become a successful business?

Should I quit my job to start my own company? Can I do it part time?

What if I fail?

My parents and family tell me that I should continue with the safe large company’s job. How do I convince them otherwise?

How to write a business plan?

How do I get funding for my idea?

How do I hire a team?

How do I take my startup from an idea to a product to breakeven to scaled up business?

Which technology stack should I use for my idea?

What lifestyle I may expect once I become an entrepreneur?

While we don’t pretend we have all the answers. We have some experience in going through similar challenges ourself and have luckily come out of the tough first few years of a startup to a small tech business which can and is scaling. We believe we can help the entrepreneurs in making more informed deceisions, or at least focussing on the right issues.

To begin with, we will conduct offline workshops (on Saturdays) for entrepreneurs with som experienced speakers guiding the audience. We will also conduct one o one sessions for your specific business too. This is a no profit initiative., funded by uTrade Solutions team.

We welcome all mentors and mentees to participate and help grow the entrepreneurship awareness. We cant make successful entrepreneurs, but we can try to make them more aware and informed for sure.

Please like the page, promote it, suggest how we can improve it and join in our events.

Towards the end of last week, a challenge was laid down on Full Tilt Poker, it was for $1,000,000. The two players? Patrik Antonius, and Rui Cao.

Most of you will have heard of Patrik, he was a member of the Full Tilt stable of pros before Black Friday, is a former tennis player, a regular on poker TV shows and has been involved in some of the biggest online poker hands in history.

Patrik recently came 3rd at the Aussie Millions for a cool $600k, but has had a swingy time of it online. Before today’s action he was currently down about$143k

Rui Cao may be a little more of a mystery to you. He’s a high stakes cash reg, and a former “Team Limpers” instructor at Full Tilt. He was born in 먹튀검증 China, before moving to France in his childhood. He is currently playing from the UK, and has been having a neutral start to 2013. Before this challenge he was down about $82k, but was climbing out of a much deeper downswing.

They were playing on Full Tilt last Wednesday, when Rui offered the challenge to Patrik in the Chat Box:

“Patrik Antonius: ok

Rui Cao: by the way

Rui Cao: wanna play a challenge?*

Rui Cao: lets say 1M freeezeout NL PLO and deuce?*

Patrik Antonius: it depents what kind of

Patrik Antonius: this would be online?

Rui Cao: yes

Patrik Antonius: i would do that

Rui Cao: ok lets say next tuesday?

Rui Cao: so i can wire the money

Rui Cao: ok

Rui Cao: lets do 300 deuce

Rui Cao: 100 BB

Rui Cao: 400 plo

Rui Cao: 10 buy ins

Rui Cao: 200 400

Patrik Antonius: i dont know the day so far i can play but we can agee to do the challenge

Rui Cao: 300 holdem

Rui Cao: can u be sure u can do it?

Rui Cao: so i wire the money

Patrik Antonius: yes i can give you my word on it

Rui Cao: ok 300 at 200 400 nl

Rui Cao: 400 plo

Rui Cao: 300 deuce

Rui Cao: ok?

Patrik Antonius: how about 400 in holdem 300 in deuce and 300 in plo?

Rui Cao: 350 holdem 350 plo

Rui Cao: 300 DEUCE

Rui Cao: its fair i think

Patrik Antonius: ok thats fair

Rui Cao: do you have

Rui Cao: skype

Rui Cao: or whatever so we can discuss

Rui Cao: some things

Patrik Antonius: yes can you get my phone number from someone so i can give you my skype then?”

So, with the action planned over 3 different games, and with each player putting up a million dollars, this isn’t the kind of event that tends to happen every day.

This isn’t the 1st time these two have battled over large sums of money. the battled back in May 2011 on Full Tilt Poker at the $500/$1000 PLO tables. Rui lost $800k to Antonius in a single session.

The 1st session in this heads up battle happened last night, at the £1.5k/$3k 2-7 TD tables on Full Tilt. It didn’t last long, and the 1st hand set the tone for the action. Rui Cao won the $15k pot, and then continued to bleed Patrik over the next 350 hands and about 3 hours.

With the first $330k part of Antonius’ $1 million already in Rui’s account, we are eagerly anticipating the PLO and NLHE rounds.

With both players being of such a high quality, we can’t say with any certainty what’s going to happen in the next rounds. Both players are among the elite, but we’d probably give the NLHE edge to Patrik, while the PLO really is going to be a coin flip in our estimation.

We are hoping we can grab some of the hands from these sessions, and if we do, we’ll bring them to you on FTR.

 

FTOP VIII Event 15 featured HA (half PL Hold’em, half PL Omaha), which pulled in a nice 932 players into the competition.  With a buy-in of $200+$16 and a guarantee of $150,000, the prize pool was sure to surpass the guarantee.  The prize pool busted the guarantee by about $36,400 more, making it a nice $186,400!  This FTOPS VIII event was hosted by German Full Tilt Pro, Eddy Scharf.  Scharf is a Lufthansa pilot and has the honor of carrying two WSOP bracelets in Limit Omaha.  Despite his obvious success, it wasn’t enough to land him in the money this time around.

It wasn’t only Eddy Scharf facing rough waters in this  꽁머니사이 tournament though, as it turned out to be a rather unfriendly forum for all the professionals!  In fact, the only Full Tilt Professional to make it in the money was Stuart Paterson.  Paterson finished 62nd overall for a measly $447, doubling his initial investment.

Siggen, the event’s 1st place winner, scored a cool $42,872.  Siggen has enjoyed a lot of success in online poker.  Some of his recent scores are this event, $27,863 in the WCOOP-12 on PokerStars, and $6,084 in a $109 rebuy tournament on Stars.  Other notable online players include Alan Nissim (hamazriya, Jared Okun (Smokinokun) and Matt Smith (SamENole.)

Schildy1984 wins PokerStars WCOOP Event 28

This year’s World Championship of Online Poker is in full swing at PokerStars, with players from around the globe competing for awesome prize pools in exciting tournaments. We’re fast-approaching the halfway mark of the series, so a huge amount of cash has already been won but, more importantly, there’s also a lot of it up for grabs. Event 28 wrapped up earlier this week, and the lucky winner to walk away with the number one spot was Schildy1984 of Austria, who received $206,280 for a job well done.

The World Championship of Online Poker is pretty much exactly what the name suggests. It can be seen as the internet’s answer to the World Series of Poker, and the PokerStars hosted series is by far and away the largest such online series around. This 2011 series boasts a massive combined guaranteed prize pool of $30,000,000, which is much larger than many were expecting given the withdrawal of PokerStars from the US market. The combined prize pool is spread over 62 events this year, which offer a great variety so players of any game should be able to find a tournament they’ll love.

Event 28 was one of the more standard formats, a simple No Limit Holdem tournament with no surprises. The buy-in was respectable at $1,000, and 1146 players decided to register and take their shot at the money. This many contestants lead to an almost doubling of the prizepool from its guaranteed $600,000 to the final figure of $1,146,000, to be divided among the top 135 players, with the winner allocated over $200,000. The event dragged on over two days before finally finishing less than an hour into September 15th.

After nearly two days of grueling button clicking and close decisions, the tournament got down to just three entrants, two players from Austria and one from neighboring Australia. The Australian player, delaney_kid, was Schildy1984′s first casualty, and was sent to the rail in third place. This gave Schildy1984 a slightly more than 3:2 chip lead against fellow countryman TheFan83 as Heads Up play commenced. While the chip edge was small, it was more than enough for Schildy who dispensed his opponent within a dozen hands when his flopped overpair turned a set to beat TheFan83′s two pair when the money went all-in on the river. Runner-up TheFan83 received just under $150,000 for his efforts, and the winner on the day Schildy1984 walked away with the pride, the title, and $206,280.00 in tournament winnings.